Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Didn’t Endorse Gov. Walker’s Agenda

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's right-leaning editorial board controversially endorsed Gov. Scott Walker... which is controversial because they've spent the last year knocking Gov. Walker's controversial policies.

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Here are some quick examples:

Walker, GOP took eyes off the ball on job creation – April 28, 2012

Wisconsin lost nearly 24,000 jobs over the past 12 months – the only state in the union with “statistically significant” job losses over that period, according to a new federal government report. For a governor who promised thousands of new jobs would be created on his watch and who now faces an unprecedented electoral challenge, that had to be troubling news. It’s certainly troubling for job seekers across the state.

Walker’s Republican colleagues in the Legislature did find time for voter ID, promoting abstinence in the place of comprehensive sex education and other issues that play well with social conservatives. But their lack of political discipline was disappointing at a time when the state needs smart strategic thinking and execution and to maintain a laserlike focus on the main problem the state has: a lack of jobs.

Repeal of ‘09 law harms discrimination victims – April 12, 2012

We don’t think that Gov. Scott Walker and the Republicans in the Legislature have launched a war on women, as some critics allege. We’d describe it more as a “police action.” Take four bills signed by Gov. Scott Walker last week that put new restrictions on abortions, require schools that teach sex education to promote marriage and allow districts to teach abstinence-only courses, and close the state courts to those seeking punitive damages in workplace discrimination cases. No doubt, there are many women in Wisconsin who agree with these measures, but for those who identify discrimination, abortion and teen pregnancy with women’s rights, these bills are an attack on those rights. The Legislature would be wise to reconsider these measures when it returns to session next year. Not one of these is good public policy.

Legislature’s rail aversion is a missed opportunity – March 20, 2012

In any case, Walker should have shown more support for a vital link with the Chicago market – a link that Wisconsin would be wise to capitalize on in any way it can.

Walker should veto bill that turns back the clock – March 16, 2012

A bill sitting on Gov. Scott Walker’s desk would return Wisconsin to the bad not-so-old days in sex education when school districts could teach abstinence-only courses. He should veto the measure. The bill repeals the Healthy Youth Act of 2010, which banned abstinence-only courses for the very good reason that students deserve a curriculum proven to reduce risky behaviors that contribute to the teen pregnancy rate.

Another good decision on state’s voter ID law – March 14, 2012

Monday’s ruling by Dane County Circuit Judge Richard Niess spells out in compelling argument why Wisconsin’s voter ID law is unconstitutional. The law, he essentially says, creates a new class of citizen who is barred from voting, those without the right form of state-mandated photo ID. That the Wisconsin Constitution does not allow, he says. That’s not the final word – this one was always destined for the state Supreme Court – but Niess makes a good case.

John Doe probe must go where the evidence leads – January 29, 2012

Questions abound – and Walker so far hasn’t answered enough of them. On Friday, the governor declined to answer most questions, saying he wanted to abide by the rules of the John Doe probe.

Walker wrong to halt work on insurance exchanges – January 10, 2012

Gov. Scott Walker’s decision to stop work on Wisconsin’s insurance exchanges, which are mandated by health care reform, is shortsighted and could give the federal government more influence over the state’s insurance market than it should have. Walker and state officials should reconsider their decision.

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Cody currently oversees online communications, web development, and graphic design at One Wisconsin Now & the Institute, having served previously as Deputy Research Director.