Scott Walker’s Record on Labor Issues

Gov. Scott Walker vaulted to national prominence over his attacks on the rights of 175,000 Wisconsin workers shortly after taking office in 2011. His divisive attacks on hardworking Wisconsinites continue to polarize the state. In 2015 he continued his agenda of attacking working families and unions when he signed a wrong for Wisconsin right to work law, undermining the strong relationships built between private unions and their employers.

But the politically motivated union-busting attacks are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Walker’s anti-worker stances. As Milwaukee County executive, Walker balanced his budgets on the backs of workers and made consistent efforts to privatize public services.

As governor, Walker’s anti-labor positions range from layoffs and privatization to opposing increasing the minimum wage and an equal pay enforcement laws.

A comprehensive analysis entitled “D is for Dismantle,” authored by the non-partisan One Wisconsin Institute shows that despite claims from Gov. Scott Walker, Wisconsin schools are not failing, instead his budget cuts and disastrous education policies endanger our proud tradition of excellent schools. []

But the principal hasn’t been paid back yet. Unions and liberal groups like One Wisconsin Now are also upset that M & I executives gave more money to Scott Walker during last... []

Scot Ross talked about the ongoing legislative battle between the governor of Wisconsin and state Democrats on the budget, and he responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. Part of Governor Scott... []

One Wisconsin Now, the progressive watchdog group that has provided the closest monitoring of Walker’s budgetary gamesmanship, explains: “Since his inauguration in early January, Walker has approved $140 million in new special-interest []

Gov. Scott Walker’s scheme to allow the government to take away the rights of Wisconsin workers is part of an unbalanced and potentially unconstitutional proposal that would add at least $30 million to the state’s credit card and allow the Governor’s health agency director to slash health care access and raise costs without the approval of the legislature. []